Injury and Illness Prevention Program

By Robert B. Milligan, Mark A. Lies, II, Adam R. YoungIlana R. Morady, and Craig B. Simonsen

Seyfarth Synopsis: A new California State guidance provides direction for dine-in restaurants, brewpubs, craft distilleries, breweries, bars, pubs, and wineries to provide a healthy and clean environment for workers and customers. 

The State COVID-19 industry guidance site
Continue Reading Cal/OSHA and Health Department Publish COVID-19 Guidance for Dine-in Restaurants

By Benjamin D. BriggsBrent I. ClarkIlana R. Morady, and Craig B. Simonsen

Seyfarth Synopsis: The Cal/OSH Standards Board has adopted provisions that require employers to provide a copies of their IIPPs upon employee requests. 

If you’re a loyal reader of our blog, you’ve already seen our Reminder To All Employers With Establishments in California:
Continue Reading Changes to Cal/OSHA IIPP Standard Entitle Employees to Copy of Injury and Illness Prevention Program

By Joshua M. Henderson, Ilana R. Morady, Adam R. Young, Matthew A. Sloan, and Craig B. Simonsen

Seyfarth Synopsis:  The Cal/OSH Standards Board will vote this week on a proposed standard requiring employers to provide their employees and employee representatives access to the company’s Injury and Illness Prevention Program.

On January 16, 2020, the California
Continue Reading This Week – Cal/OSH Board to Vote on New Regulation to Allow Employees to Request Workplace Injury and Illness Prevention Program

By Joshua M. Henderson and Ilana R. Morady

Seyfarth Synopsis:  One of the unique elements of Cal/OSHA is a requirement that ALL employers have a written Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP). 8 CCR 3203.

Despite the IIPP requirement being “on the books” since 1991, many employers in California still do not have an IIPP. In fact Cal/OSHA
Continue Reading Reminder To All Employers With Establishments in California: You Are Required To Have An Injury and Illness Prevention Program — No Ifs Ands Or Buts

By Joshua M. Henderson

Consider this not-so-hypothetical example.  An employer in California receives a citation from Cal/OSHA for a relatively minor safety violation involving no employee injuries.  Maybe the citation was for inadequate training on a particular workplace hazard.  The citation carries with it a penalty of $500.  The employer could appeal the citation, and spend perhaps thousands of dollars
Continue Reading Cal/OSHA Considers Changes to Its Policy on “Repeat” Violations — With Significant Implications for Employers