By Brent I. ClarkJames L. CurtisBenjamin D. BriggsMatthew A. Sloan, and Craig B. Simonsen

Seyfarth Synopsis:  OSHA has just been sued for removing the requirements for establishments with 250 or more employees to electronically submit information from OSHA Form 300 (Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses), and OSHA Form 301 (Injury and Illness Incident Report) to OSHA each year.  These establishments will still be required to electronically submit information from OSHA Form 300A (Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses).

A coalition of groups including the Public Citizen’s Health Research Group (PCHRG), American Public Health Association, and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists filed a complaint against the U.S. Department of Labor and its Occupational Safety and Health Administration.  PCHRG v Acosta, No. 19-CV-166, (D. D.C. January 25, 2019).  The lawsuit challenges OSHA’s decision to amend a 2016 rule on the “Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses” to remove the requirement that businesses with 250 or more workers electronically submit logs of each on-the-job injury or illness their workers sustain, although these employers must still keep such records on site.

We had recently blogged about OSHA’s just issued final rule (the Rollback Rule) to remove the requirements for establishments with 250 or more employees to electronically submit information from OSHA Form 300 and OSHA Form 301 to OSHA each year.  Under the now amended rules these establishments will still be required to electronically submit information from OSHA Form 300A. 84 Fed. Reg. 380 (January 25, 2019).

The PCHRG suit claims that the Rollback Rule should be declared “unlawful and set aside because OSHA has failed to provide a reasoned explanation for its change in position, failed to adequately consider comments submitted in opposition to the change, and relied on considerations that have no sound basis in law.”  According to the lawsuit, “OSHA’s action, findings, and conclusions are arbitrary, capricious, an abuse of discretion, and otherwise not in accordance with law.”

Under the current rules, the deadline for electronic submissions of the calendar year 2018 OSHA Form 300A information is March 2, 2019.

For more information on this or any related topic please contact the authors, your Seyfarth attorney, or any member of the Seyfarth Workplace Safety and Health (OSHA/MSHA) Team.

By James L. CurtisBenjamin D. Briggs, Brent I. ClarkAdam R. Young, and Craig B. Simonsen

Seyfarth Synopsis:  OSHA has just issued its final rule that removes the requirement for establishments with 250 or more employees to electronically submit information from OSHA Form 300 (Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses), and OSHA Form 301 (Injury and Illness Incident Report) to OSHA each year.  These establishments will still be required to electronically submit information from OSHA Form 300A (Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses). 84 Fed. Reg. 380 (January 25, 2019).

In May 2016, under the Obama Administration, the Department of Labor issued a final rule that would have required companies with 250 or more employees to electronically submit their OSHA 300, 301 and 300A forms annually. The information, which would contain summaries of employee names and injuries, would be maintained on government computer systems, but could be requested by third parties such as labor unions, special interest groups, or even competing companies who have an interest in such information.

In light of the legitimate worker privacy concerns, OSHA, under the Trump Administration, in July 2018, issued a proposed rule that would narrow the electronic disclosure rule.  However, some special interest groups, comprised of public-health advocacy groups, viewed the information contained in employers’ OSHA forms as a valuable source of workplace health data.  As such, these groups previously sued to reinstate the final rule that required employers to submit OSHA 300 and 301 forms electronically.  A federal court recently denied that request.

The court in Pub. Citizen Health Research Grp. v Acosta, No. 1:18-cv-01729, 2018 BL 459531 (D.D.C. Dec. 12, 2018), reasoned that the interest groups would have to show “irreparable harm” by not being able to access the OSHA forms to succeed in their lawsuit.  They were unable to show “irreparable harm” because OSHA has issued a notice of proposed rulemaking that narrows the electronic disclosure rule, but could change their mind and ultimately require employers to submit the forms electronically.  As such, the court reasoned, such groups could potentially obtain such information in the future.  Further, the court stated that OSHA’s delay in accepting the OSHA forms does not prevent the special interest groups from conducting the same type of workplace safety research independently.  Because they are not “irreparably” harmed by OSHA’s actions, the Court denied the relief they sought.

Revised Electronic Reporting Requirement

OSHA’s January 25, 2019 final rule limits the electronic submission requirement to the 300A summary for establishments who are required to keep OSHA records and with 250 or more employees.  Establishments with 20 or more (but fewer than 250) employees in certain specified industries (in Appendix A to the regulation) must also submit form 300As.

OSHA believes that this final rule will better protect personally identifiable information or data that may be re-identified with a particular worker by removing the requirement for employers with 250 of more employees to submit their information from Forms 300 and 301 electronically. The final rule does not alter an employer’s duty to maintain OSHA Forms 300 and 301 on-site, and OSHA will continue to obtain these forms as needed through inspections and enforcement actions.

We have blogged frequently on OSHA’s electronic reporting rule.  See California Enacts New Record-Keeping Mandates in Response to Changing Federal Program, Roller Coaster Rulemaking: OSHA Publishes Proposed Rule to Reduce Injury and Illness Electronic Reporting RequirementsOSHA Intends to “Reconsider, Revise, or Remove Portions” of Injury and Illness E-Reporting Rule Next YearOSHA Delays Electronic Filing Date for Injury and Illness Records Until December 1, 2017, and Despite Lawsuit, OSHA Publishes Interpretation for New Workplace Injury and Illness Reporting Rule.

The deadline for electronic submissions of the calendar year 2018 OSHA Form 300A information is March 2, 2019.

For more information on this or any related topic please contact the authors, your Seyfarth attorney, or any member of the Seyfarth Workplace Safety and Health (OSHA/MSHA) Team.

By Joshua M. HendersonIlana R. MoradyJames L. Curtis, and Craig B. Simonsen

Seyfarth Synopsis: On November 6, 2018, the California Office of Administrative Law approved Cal/OSHA’s emergency regulation for the electronic submission of CY 2017 Form 300A on Occupational Injuries and Illnesses.  Covered employers will be required to submit their Forms to Federal OSHA by December 31, 2018.

As we previously blogged, businesses operating in California that would be required to submit the CalOSHA Form 300A online include all establishments with 250 or more employees, unless specifically exempted by section 14300.2 of Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations, and establishments with 20 to 249 employees in the specific industries listed in Appendix H of the emergency regulation’s proposed text (including common industries such as manufacturing, grocery stores, department stores, and warehousing and storage). The reporting deadline is December 31, 2018. Beginning in 2019, the reporting deadline would be March 2 of the year after the calendar year covered by the form(s). So, for example, CY 2018 300A Forms will need to be submitted by March 2, 2019.

Covered employers in California should submit their 300A summaries by following the instructions on federal OSHA’s Injury Tracking Application webpage.

Although the formal rulemaking process needs to be finalized before the emergency regulations are permanent, including a public comment period and public hearing, employers should plan to meet the upcoming December 31, 2018 deadline.  See any significant changes to the requirements summarized above.

For more information on this or any related topic please contact the authors, your Seyfarth attorney, or any member of the Workplace Safety and Health (OSHA/MSHA) Team.

By Joshua M. HendersonIlana R. MoradyJames L. Curtis, and Craig B. Simonsen

Seyfarth Synopsis: CalOSHA published a news release TODAY, on a new emergency regulation for the electronic submission of CY 2017 Form 300A on Occupational Injuries and Illnesses.  CalOSHA submitted the rule yesterday, and will allow public comments until Tuesday, October 30th, with the intention of adopting it as final by November 5th!

According to CalOSHA, businesses operating in California that would be required to submit the CalOSHA Form 300A online include all establishments with 250 or more employees, unless specifically exempted by section 14300.2 of Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations, and establishments with 20 to 249 employees in the specific industries listed on page 8 of the emergency regulation’s proposed text (including common industries such as manufacturing, grocery stores, department stores, and warehousing and storage). The reporting deadline would be December 31, 2018. Beginning in 2019, the reporting deadline would be March 2 of the year after the calendar year covered by the form(s). So, for example, CY 2018 300A Forms would be submitted by March 2, 2019.

Cal/OSHA submitted the emergency regulation amending recordkeeping sections 14300.35 and 14300.41 of Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations to the Office of Administrative Law (OAL) on October 25.  Interested persons have until “October 30 to submit comments on the proposed emergency regulation.” OAL will have until November 5 to review and adopt or deny the proposed regulation.

For more information on this or any related topic please contact the authors, your Seyfarth attorney, or any member of the Workplace Safety and Health (OSHA/MSHA) Team.

By: Brent I. ClarkJames L. Curtis, Kay R. Bonza, and Craig B. Simonsen

Seyfarth SynopsisThe Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has initiated a Site-Specific Targeting 2016 (SST-16) Program using the injury and illness information electronically submitted by employers to initiate OSHA inspections.  OSHA Directive No. 18-01, CPL 02, effective October 16, 2018.

In its news release about the Site-Specific Targeting 2016 Program, OSHA indicated that it “will target high injury rate establishments in both the manufacturing and non-manufacturing sectors for inspection.”  The agency will then perform comprehensive inspections of employers who are selected for Program.  For CY 2016, OSHA required employers to electronically submit Form 300A (Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses) by December 15, 2017. The deadline for submitting the 300A data for CY 2017 was July 1, 2018, though OSHA indicted that employers may still provide this information to the database.

The SST-16 indicates that “OSHA will create inspection lists of establishments with elevated Days Away, Restricted or Transferred (DART) rate, together with a random sample of establishments that did not provide the required 2016 Form 300A data to OSHA.”  The inspection cycles are generated using software that randomly selects the establishments from among those that fall into the categories above. According to OSHA, the purpose of including non-responding employers on the inspection list is to deter employers from failing to report their injury and illness information in order to avoid inspection.  Similarly, OSHA will select a sample of low DART rate establishments to verify the reliability of the 300A data being submitted to the agency.  The scope of the inspection will be comprehensive, and not simply limited to recordkeeping practices or potentially hazardous areas or operations that caused an elevated DART rate.  Employers who have received a comprehensive safety or health inspection within 36 months of the creation of the SST-16 inspection list will not be inspected again.

Going forward, establishments with 250 or more employees that are currently required to keep OSHA injury and illness records, and establishments with 20-249 employees that are classified in specific industries with historically high rates of occupational injuries and illnesses, will be required to electronically submit their 300A forms to OSHA each year by March 2.

In the SST-16, OSHA clearly lays out how the agency plans to use the injury and illness data it now electronically collects from employers.  Given the tangible impact the data will have on programmed OSHA inspections, employers are advised to take a proactive approach to monitor and address patterns in their injury and illness rates and should take care to ensure they are submitting accurate records to OSHA.

For more information on this or any related topic please contact the authors, your Seyfarth attorney, or any member of the Workplace Safety and Health (OSHA/MSHA) Team.

By Joshua M. HendersonIlana R. Morady, and Craig B. Simonsen

Seyfarth Synopsis:  Last week, Governor Brown signed into law Assembly Bill No. 2334, Occupational Injuries and Illness, Employer Reporting Requirements, and Electronic Submission.

A six-month statute of limitations period currently applies to all citations issued under Cal/OSHA. Assembly Bill 2334 will allow the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA), starting January 1, 2019, to cite employers for injury and illness record-keeping violations “until it is corrected, or the division discovers the violation, or the duty to comply with the violated requirement ceases to exist.” In theory, the six-month limitation period could, depending on the circumstances, extend up to the five years that employers must maintain injury and illness records.  The limit firmly remains six months for federal OSHA.  See OSHA “Removes” Late Term Rule Which Allowed OSHA to Cite Injury Recordkeeping Violations Going Back Five-Years.

The new law also may require the state to establish an advisory committee to determine whether employers should be required to file copies of their workplace injury and illness (WII) records with the state.

The law’s provisions leave many questions to be determined.  For example, if federal OSHA drops the requirement for employers to electronically file summaries of each injury with the Agency, would the committee recommend Cal/OSHA require employers to file with the state, instead?  It may well be quite a while before the committee is even created, much less makes recommendations to Cal/OSHA because the committee would conceptually be formed after federal OSHA loosens current filing requirements.

The bill appears to be a direct reaction to the Trump administration’s efforts to roll back record-keeping mandates set during the previous administration. Under the Obama administration, federal OSHA established a 5-year limit for record-keeping violations, however that limit was set aside by a congressional resolution signed by President Trump. The Trump Administration also substantially diminished employer obligations to electronically submit injury and illness data to federal OSHA.

We have frequently blogged on the contentious federal WII Rule.  See Roller Coaster Rulemaking: OSHA Publishes Proposed Rule to Reduce Injury and Illness Electronic Reporting RequirementsAll State Plan Employers are Now Required to Electronically File 2017 Form 300A DataOSHA Intends to “Reconsider, Revise, or Remove Portions” of Injury and Illness E-Reporting Rule Next YearOSHA Delays Electronic Filing Date for Injury and Illness Records Until December 1, 2017, and Despite Lawsuit, OSHA Publishes Interpretation for New Workplace Injury and Illness Reporting Rule.

For more information on this or any related topic please contact the authors, your Seyfarth attorney, or any member of the Workplace Safety and Health (OSHA/MSHA) Team.

By James L. CurtisKay R. Bonza, and Craig B. Simonsen

Seyfarth Synopsis:  OSHA today published a proposed rule to amend the injury and illness recordkeeping rules by rescinding the requirement for establishments with 250 or more employees to electronically submit information from OSHA Forms 300 and 301.  OSHA is amending provisions of the “Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses” (WII Rule) final rule to protect sensitive worker information from potential disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).  83 Fed. Reg. 36494 (July 30, 2018).

OSHA, in its Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM), has “preliminarily determined” that the risk of disclosure of information contained in OSHA Form 300 (Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses) and OSHA Form 301 (Injury and Illness Incident Report), the costs to OSHA of collecting and using the information and the reporting burden on employers are “unjustified given the uncertain benefits of collecting the information.”  The proposed rule eliminates the requirement to file the Form 300 and 301 for establishments with 250 or more employees.  These large employers will still be required to electronically file the OSHA 300A summary of work-related injuries and illnesses. OSHA submits that this proposed change will maintain safety and health protections for workers while also reducing the burden to employers of complying with the current rule.

We had blogged previously on the WII Rule.  See All State Plan Employers are Now Required to Electronically File 2017 Form 300A DataOSHA Intends to “Reconsider, Revise, or Remove Portions” of Injury and Illness E-Reporting Rule Next YearOSHA Delays Electronic Filing Date for Injury and Illness Records Until December 1, 2017, and Despite Lawsuit, OSHA Publishes Interpretation for New Workplace Injury and Illness Reporting Rule..

In the proposed rule, OSHA notes that Form 301 requires the collection of sensitive information about each individual worker’s job-linked illness or injury, information an employer must collect with or without the worker’s consent.  “While some of the information is likelier to be regarded as particularly sensitive—namely, descriptions of injuries and the body parts affected—most of the form’s questions seek answers that should not be lightly disclosed, including:”

  • Was employee treated in an emergency room?
  • Was employee hospitalized overnight as an in-patient?
  • Date of birth?
  • Date of injury?
  • What was the employee doing just before the incident occurred? Describe the activity, as well as the tools, equipment, or material the employee was using. Be specific.
  • What happened? Tell us how the injury occurred.
  • What was the injury or illness? Tell us the part of the body that was affected and how it was affected; be more specific than “hurt,” “pain,” or “sore.”
  • What object or substance directly harmed the employee?

In the May 2016 final rule (81 Fed. Reg. 29624), the recordkeeping regulation was revised to require establishments with 250 or more employees to electronically submit information from the OSHA Forms 300, 300A, and 301 to OSHA annually.  Individual injury and illness case information from these forms could be disclosed to third parties pursuant to FOIA requests from the public, thereby endangering worker privacy.  The NPRM proposes to amend OSHA’s new electronic recordkeeping regulation by rescinding the requirement for establishments with 250 or more employees to electronically submit information from the OSHA Forms 300 and 301, to protect sensitive worker information.  OSHA also admits that it has not devised a plan for how it would “collect, process, analyze distribute, and programmatically apply” this information in a meaningful way to justify its collection.

OSHA seeks comment on this proposal, particularly on its impact on worker privacy, including the risks posed by exposing workers’ sensitive information to possible FOIA disclosure.  Comments, due on September 28, 2018, may be submitted to docket number OSHA-2013-0023.

For more information on this or any related topic please contact the authors, your Seyfarth attorney, or any member of the Workplace Safety and Health (OSHA/MSHA) Team.

By Mark A. Lies, II and Adam R. Young

Seyfarth Synopworksafetysis: New OSHA final rule requires employer to submit data electronically, to be posted on the OSHA website.

On May 12, 2016 the Occupational Safety and Health Administration published the final rules requiring employers to submit injury and illness data electronically.  81 Fed. Reg. 29624.

OSHA will release this information publicly on its website, believing that its disclosure will shame employers into improving workplace safety.   The electronic data submission will also ease OSHA’s data analysis, presumably to ramp up citations against employers based on the frequency of certain types of injuries (such as OSHA’s renewed focus on “ergonomics” injuries) or injuries caused by exposures to certain chemicals or toxic materials.  The final rule also includes new anti-retaliation and injury and illness reporting provisions. The final rule will take effect on January 1, 2017.

Electronic Submission of Injury and Illness Data

Employers with 250 or more employees must submit information electronically from their 2016 Form 300A by July 1, 2017. These same employers will be required to submit information from all 2017 forms (300A, 300, and 301) by July 1, 2018. Beginning in 2019 and every year thereafter, the information must be submitted by March 2.

Establishments with 20-249 employees operating in what OSHA deems to be “high-risk industries” (including department stores, nursing homes, construction) must submit information from their 2016 Form 300A by July 1, 2017, and their 2017 Form 300A by July 1, 2018.  Beginning in 2019 and every year thereafter, the information must be submitted by March 2.

OSHA will require employers to submit all information from their logs, save for columns with employee names, employee addresses, health care professional names, and health care treatment facilities.  The rules do not specify how this information will be submitted electronically.  Though we do not know that this will be a problem, due to privacy laws, employers should not submit information that identifies a specific employee or an employee’s medical information.

Also, the electronic disclosure requirements will apply to employers located in State Plan States.

Online Posting

OSHA will then post this data on a publicly available website, which will be accessible by competitors, contractors, employees, and employee representatives.  The specifics of its new data disclosure portal are not explained in the regulations.

Anti-Retaliation and Injury Reporting Procedure

The final rules re-state and enhance protections from retaliation for employees who report work-relate injuries or illnesses.  Further, the regulations require that an employer establish a reasonable procedure for employees to report work-related injuries and illnesses promptly and accurately. A procedure is not reasonable if it would deter or discourage a reasonable employee from accurately reporting a workplace injury or illness.

For additional advice on injury and illness reporting, contact your Seyfarth attorney.

Starting January 1, 2015, OSHA’s recordkeeping rules will undergo a change to two key provisions.

One, a number of industries that were previously not required to keep OSHA injury and illness records will now have to maintain a log to comply with OSHA standards, and two, the list of severe work-related injuries and hospitalizations that must be reported to OSHA in less than 24 hours has been expanded.

We invite you to join our webinar on November 19th, at 1:00 pm ET, for an in-depth look at these new rules. Topics will include:

  • Updates to OSHA’s Recordkeeping Rule;
  • Log Assistance and Training;
  • Key Aspects of Recordkeeping;
  • Civil and Criminal Penalties for Log Maintenance Failure; and
  • Recommendations on Responding to OSHA Inspections.

Seyfarth Shaw’s Mark Lies and Kerry Mohan will speak on the legal aspects and interpretations of the rule’s revisions, while David Malter, the President of Malter Associates, Inc., will provide an overview of the OSHA log for the new entities now required to record keep logs, as well as discuss the key recordkeeping aspects for entities already maintaining a logs.

There is no cost to attend this program, however, registration is required.

By James L. Curtis and Craig B. Simonsen

In a stunning finding, after public hearings, OSHA has concluded, based on “many stakeholders expressed concern,” that its illness reporting requirements proposal “could motivate employers to under-record injuries and illnesses.” 79 Fed. Reg. 47605 (August 14, 2014).

As we noted in an earlier blog (OSHA Shame Game Continues: Its Plan to Publish Injury Rates For Employers With Over 250 Employees), the underlying proposed rule would amend OSHA recordkeeping regulations to add requirements for the electronic submission of injury and illness information that employers are required to keep under OSHA recording and reporting regulations. Under current regulations, employers with eleven or more employees are required to keep and maintain OSHA 300, 300A, and 301 injury and illness logs that document work-related injuries. Though an employer is required to post its 300A summary form at the workplace from February 1st through April 30th every year, it is not required to make the 300A form public or provide any employee injury and illness information to the public. In fact, doing so may run afoul of various state and federal laws, including HIPAA, the ADA, and the FMLA.

The OSHA proposed rule provides that employers with more than 250 employees would be required to file electronic injury and illness reports to OSHA on a quarterly basis, in addition to whenever OSHA requests such information. Through this rulemaking OSHA intends to also make an employer’s electronic injury and illness reports, including the current 300, 300A, and 301 forms, minus the injured employee’s name and identifying information, available over the Internet to the general public.

As a result, third parties of all kinds, including employees, community activists, and plaintiff’s attorneys would be able to access injury and illness information and could use that information to demand concessions, protest an employer’s activities, or bring lawsuits against the employer.

Now, since public hearings on the proposal have been held, OSHA is suggesting that the “proposal could promote an increase in workplace policies and procedures that deter or discourage employees from reporting work related injuries and illnesses. These include adopting unreasonable requirements for reporting injuries and illnesses and retaliating against employees who report injuries and illnesses.” To “protect the integrity of the injury and illness data,” OSHA is now considering adding provisions that will make it a violation for an employer to discourage employee reporting in these ways.

Much like an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, but actually late in the rulemaking proceeding, OSHA is now asking whether to amend the proposed rule to: 1) require that employers inform their employees of their right to report injuries and illnesses; 2) more clearly communicate the requirement that any injury and illness reporting requirements established by the employer be reasonable and not unduly burdensome; and 3) provide OSHA an additional remedy to prohibit employers from taking adverse action against employees for reporting injuries and illnesses.

To facilitate discussion on this “late innings” added proposal modification, OSHA is extending the comment period again. Public comments, including comments on the OSHA’s new provisions to “protect the integrity of the injury and illness data,” are due on October 14, 2014.